Social Studies

COURSES
United States History I 
U.S. History I begins in 1763 with the Treaty of Paris, and concludes with World War I.  Studies will include domestic changes such as industrialization and the development of cities, and America’s emerging role in world events. Students will develop historical thinking skills while working with primary and secondary sources.  They will also create and develop original historical claims using relevant historical evidence and effective analysis. Outside classroom preparation and note-taking skills are essential. 

United States History I (Honors)
Honors U.S. History I contains the same content as U.S. History I, but in greater depth. Outside preparation and research will be required.  Students will develop historical thinking skills while working with primary and secondary sources. They will also create and develop original historical claims using relevant historical evidence and effective analysis.   Writing will be an integral part of this course. 

United States History II 
This course is designed to stimulate your mind about the exciting and frightening times between 1920 and present day.  You will express your feelings, backed with facts, through debates about the Sacco and Vanzetti case, the pros and cons of the Treaty of Versailles, dropping the Atomic bombs on Japan, fighting in the Vietnam War, and much more.  You will also role play as you will decide how you would have handled the Cuban Missile Crisis, Berlin Crisis, and other international issues. Be prepared as you will investigate the assassination of JFK and conclude who committed this heinous crime—and why?  This course will prepare you to think independently as well as with others, come to conclusions supported by facts, write efficiently, and help you understand the roots, controversies and the accomplishments of the United States.

United States History II (Honors)
This course is intended to meet the same basic standards of U.S. History II. However, Honors U.S. History II differs from U.S. History II in its level of intensity and additional requirements.  A higher level of academic expectation and personal responsibility will be demanded of the student in this course.  Students will develop historical thinking skills while working with primary and secondary sources.  They will also create and develop original historical claims using relevant historical evidence and effective analysis. Outside classroom preparation, note-taking, and time management are essential.

Advanced Placement United States History
This college level course involves the study of U.S. history from colonial times to the present. Students will develop historical thinking skills while working with primary and secondary sources.  They will also create and develop original historical claims using relevant historical evidence and effective analysis. This course involves a great deal of writing – including both explanatory and documentary essays. Outside reading and note-taking is required in this demanding course. Students who complete the course also are required to take the A.P. examination given by the College Examination Board in May. A summer assignment is assigned in June and submitted in mid-August.

**Students may receive college credit; however, this is dependent upon the college and the grade earned on the A.P. U. S. History exam. There is an A.P. exam fee associated with this course.** 

Modern World History
Why is there war and conflict in our modern world?  What are the root causes of inequality in our world today? Who has power in our modern society? How is that power wielded? How have humans related to their environment in the past and where does this put us now? Explore these questions and more in this course that focuses on issues and topics in world history from the 18th century to the present. We will critically examine primary and secondary sources and other selected readings. While conducting in-depth analyses, we will work together to try to answer these ongoing questions in modern world history. Perhaps most importantly, we will decide what their implications are for today. Students will play an integral role in formulating further questions, seeking out and creating answers, thinking through possibilities, and evaluating how successful we were in our work.

Modern World History (Honors)
This course is intended to meet the same basic standards of Modern World History. However, Honors Modern World History will differ in its level of intensity and additional requirements. Students will be asked to create and develop original historical claims using relevant historical evidence and effective analysis. This course involves a great deal of writing – including both explanatory and documentary essays. Outside reading and note-taking is required in this course.  A summer assignment is assigned in June and submitted in September.

U.S. Government & Economics
How do citizens create rules and institutions that allow our nation and the world to flourish?  How do we ensure that the world’s resources are enjoyed by all segments of society? As students approach the end of the high school career, this course asks students to apply the tools of history, political science and economics to examine answers to these enduring questions. This is a required course designed to develop the student's understanding of the federal government and politics in the United States. This course will be broken into essential parts dealing with the Foundations of Government, the Three Branches of Government, and the Political System as well as the basics of the American economic system and the introductory principles of economics.  

U.S. Government & Economics (Honors)
This course is intended to meet the same basic standards of U. S. Government & Economics. However, Honors U. S. Government & Economics will differ in its level of intensity and additional requirements. Students will engage in extensive research and work towards developing and defending original claims.  Outside reading and research is required in this course.

Advanced Placement U.S. Government & Politics

A.P. U.S. Government and Politics will provide an analytical perspective on government and politics in the U.S. We will study general concepts and interpret U.S. politics. This will require familiarity with terms, institutions, groups, beliefs and ideas that constitute U.S. Politics. We will cover Constitutional underpinnings, political beliefs, political parties, political behavior, interest groups, the institutions of national government, public policy and civil rights. Students taking this class will complete a summer assignment. Students are required to take part in online discussion outside of class throughout the year. Students who complete the course are required to take the A.P exam.

**Students may receive college credit; however, this is dependent upon the college and the grade earned on the A.P. U.S. Government and Politics exam. There is an A.P. exam fee associated with this course.** 

Basic Law
This course gives students an introduction to Law and the Legal System in America. By studying cases and conducting research, students gain a basic knowledge of our court system, lawyers, law enforcement officials, criminal law, civil law and juvenile justice. Guest speakers and field trips will be utilized to enhance the learning when possible.  Students will be responsible for writing a number of case studies as well as researching and writing one term paper.  Supplemental cases and readings will be used in conjunction with the textbook.  

Online Courses

  • American Foreign Policy
  • American Multiculturalism Section
  • AP Psychology
  • Constitutional Law
  • Criminology
  • Current Issues in American Law and Justice
  • Democracy in America?
  • Digital Geography - More than a Jeopardy Category!
  • Eastern and Western Thought
  • Film and Literature: The European Experience
  • Foundations of a Nation: Early American History
  • Gods of CNN: The Power of Modern Media
  • Lewis and Clark's Expedition: An Interactive Journey
  • Peacemaking
  • Pearl Harbor to the Atomic Bomb: The Pacific War, 1941-1945
  • Practical Law: What You Need to Know About the
  • Law
  • Pre-AP Economics
  • Pre-AP Psychology
  • Pre-AP U.S. History
  • Service-Learning
  • Sports and American Society
  • The Golden Age of Classical Greece
  • The Holocaust
  • Western Cultural Humanities: A Tour of Arts and Ideas
  • World Area Studies: Ancient and Modern
  • Civilizations
  • World Conflict, a United Nations Introduction

Website by SchoolMessenger Presence. © 2018 West Corporation. All rights reserved.